READ THE NIGHT CIRCUS NOW!

Published March 17, 2016 by Kattie Sivley

Today’s prompt:

Here’s the promptI know I said this extravaganza wasn’t about reviews, but this is a little different. This is your favorite book in the history of ever. This entire review would be incoherent spewing coming from your heart because you love this book. You’re not even really reviewing it. You are writing a love poem, a sonnet for this book, and possibly buying it an engagement ring and lots of chocolate (but keep it away from the pages!).

I’ve mentioned my love of the Night Circus before here, here, here, here, and here.

This book is amazing.  It is my go-to book for recommendations, when any one asks me what to read.  I even talked my mother in law into reading it.  IT IS SO GOOD!

(Photo Credit)

It is amazing, and I want to live there and never leave.  It is about magic and love and a circus that arrives without warning.  I’ve heard rumors that they are making this into a movie, and that will seriously either be the most epic movie ever, or the biggest let down of all time.  Here are some of my favorite quotes from the book:

“The finest of pleasures are always the unexpected ones.”

“You may tell a tale that takes up residence in someone’s soul, becomes their blood and self and purpose. That tale will move them and drive them and who knows that they might do because of it, because of your words. That is your role, your gift.”

“People see what they wish to see. And in most cases, what they are told that they see.”

“Secrets have power. And that power diminishes when they are shared, so they are best kept and kept well. Sharing secrets, real secrets, important ones, with even one other person, will change them. Writing them down is worse, because who can tell how many eyes might see them inscribed on paper, no matter how careful you might be with it. So it’s really best to keep your secrets when you have them, for their own good, as well as yours.”

“Most maidens are perfectly capable of rescuing themselves in my experience, at least the ones worth something, in any case.”

“Someone needs to tell those tales. When the battles are fought and won and lost, when the pirates find their treasures and the dragons eat their foes for breakfast with a nice cup of Lapsang souchong, someone needs to tell their bits of overlapping narrative. There’s magic in that. It’s in the listener, and for each and every ear it will be different, and it will affect them in ways they can never predict. From the mundane to the profound. You may tell a tale that takes up residence in someone’s soul, becomes their blood and self and purpose. That tale will move them and drive them and who knows what they might do because of it, because of your words. That is your role, your gift. Your sister may be able to see the future, but you yourself can shape it, boy. Do not forget that… there are many kinds of magic, after all.”

“Life takes us to unexpected places sometimes. The future is never set in stone, remember that.”

“I am tired of trying to hold things together that cannot be held. Trying to control what cannot be controlled. I am tired of denying myself what I want for fear of breaking things I cannot fix. They will break no matter what we do.”

“We lead strange lives, chasing our dreams around from place to place.”

“Stories have changed, my dear boy,” the man in the grey suit says, his voice almost imperceptibly sad. “There are no more battles between good and evil, no monsters to slay, no maidens in need of rescue. Most maidens are perfectly capable of rescuing themselves in my experience, at least the ones worth something, in any case. There are no longer simple tales with quests and beasts and happy endings. The quests lack clarity of goal or path. The beasts take different forms and are difficult to recognize for what they are. And there are never really endings, happy or otherwise. Things keep overlapping and blur, your story is part of your sister’s story is part of many other stories, and there in no telling where any of them may lead. Good and evil are a great deal more complex than a princess and a dragon, or a wolf and a scarlet-clad little girl. And is not the dragon the hero of his own story? Is not the wolf simply acting as a wolf should act? Though perhaps it is a singular wolf who goes to such lengths as to dress as a grandmother to toy with its prey.”

“But dreams have ways of turning into nightmares.”

“The most difficult thing to read is time. Maybe because it changes so many things.”

“I would have written you, myself, if I could put down in words everything I want to say to you. A sea of ink would not be enough.’ ‘But you built me dreams instead.”

“People don’t pay much attention to anything unless you give them reason to”

“Good and evil are a great deal more complex than a princess and a dragon . . . is not the dragon the hero of his own story?”

“I do not mourn the loss of my sister because she will always be with me, in my heart,” she says. “I am, however, rather annoyed that my Tara has left me to suffer you lot alone. I do not see as well without her. I do not hear as well without her. I do not feel as well without her. I would be better off without a hand or a leg than without my sister. Then at least she would be here to mock my appearance and claim to be the pretty one for a change. We have all lost our Tara, but I have lost a part of myself as well.”

“The truest tales require time and familiarity to become what they are.”

“And there are never really endings, happy or otherwise. Things keep going on, they overlap and blur, your story is part of your sister’s story is part of many other stories, and there is no telling where any of them may lead.”

“He reads histories and mythologies and fairy tales, wondering why it seems that only girls are ever swept away from their mundane lives on farms by knights or princes or wolves. It strikes him as unfair to not have the same fanciful opportunity himself. And he is not in the position to do any rescuing of his own.”

 

I could go on and on, basically the entire book is written beautifully full of amazing dialogue and settings.  OMG READ IT.  Do yourself a favor. And me a favor so that we can talk about it.

8

PS: Have you read The Night Circus? What are your thoughts?

 

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